Tuesday, November 22, 2011

The Day My Blundstones Died

In 2009 I wrote a post about the Betts Shoes for Old Feet  wherein I described the many years of service I had from a pair of Airflex shoes. Today I have to decry the death of my Blundstones.

That death occurred in a very embarrassing and messy way. Having not worn my Blundstones for a while, I decided to wear them to work yesterday, the fateful day.

I work at what is known as "Q Block", the Prisoner Services Section at a correctional facility and have a modest office with a carpeted floor and share the block with 25 other people. The hallways consist of painted concrete and after a short while my colleagues started commenting on the black flecks appearing from one end of the block to the other (from coffee room to photocopier).

Eventually, the black flecks also appeared on my carpet and I realised that I was the offender. Within an hour or two, my carpet looked like the Stuart Highway (connecting Adelaide with Darwin) when a road train has a tyre blowout ... pieces of rubber everywhere!

As I had nothing else to wear, I had to continue walking and depositing shoe rubber for the remainder of my day. By the end of my shift, the two heels of my boots were almost completely demolished and parts of the sole were falling off too.

The photo at left shows some of the damage.

Now I'm left wondering why a pair of shoes that were so comfortable and which have walked the hills of Oman, the streets of Al Ain and Prague, visited the Louvre, and been many other places all of a sudden decided to fall apart.

There's a kind of sadness when you end a relationship with a friend that has provided so much comfort for so long.

Robin

1 comment:

Robin said...

Leonie Smith from Blundstones in Tasmania emailed me with the following reason why the shoes had dematerialised:

"The polyurethane used in the soling material is made up of thousands of air bubbles - this gives it the soft, cushioned feeling underfoot. When the footwear is not worn for a considerable length of time, moisture builds up within the air pockets and causes the gradual breakdown of the sole. This is why we provide the care instructions on the swing tags attached to the footwear, which advise that the footwear be worn on a regular basis. This does not occur when the boots are worn regularly as the moisture is pushed out of the air pockets."

So there you go.